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December 15, 2015

Fancy a cuppa? Got time for a brew?

Travel around the UK a bit and you’ll find that tea is not just known as ‘tea’: so ubiquitous is it that there are plenty of¬†regional and affectionate names for our favourite drink. A cuppa, a brew, a cup of char, a Rosy Lee (Cockney rhyming slang), a builder’s will all get you the same thing: a nice cup of steaming hot, milky tea. Lovely!

tea

Tea is so important to us that it’s even filtered into our everyday language and is integral to some of our common idioms. Here are a few examples:

Not for all the tea in China!

You want me to do what?? Not for all the tea in China! Essentially meaning that you wouldn’t do something, no matter how good the reward.

It’s not my cup of tea.

Are you enjoying this programme? Not really- it’s not my cup of tea. Very simply, if something’s not your cup of tea, you don’t like it.

As useful as a chocolate teapot.

Fairly self-explanatory: not useful in the slightest.

Tea and sympathy

If someone’s upset, you might give them tea and sympathy (a nice strong cup of hot tea offering, of course,¬†immeasurable comfort).

Tea leaf

Oy! That tea leaf’s ‘alf-inched me wallet! In Cockney rhyming slang, a tea leaf is a thief! (And, in case you’re wondering, to half inch is to pinch.)
Can you think of anymore tea idioms? Lets us know on Twitter or Facebook.

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